Wednesday, 10 February 2016

YOUNG WOMEN WITH HIGH - FIBRE DIET MAY HAVE LOWER BREAST CANCER RISK


A US study suggests teenagers and young women who eat a high-fibre diet based on eating plenty of fruit and vegetables have a reduced risk of breast cancer in later life.

This large and lengthy study tracked around 90,000 US female nurses over 20 years. It found that women whose dietary habits during adolescence and early adulthood placed them in the top fifth highest average fibre intake group (top quintile) were around 25% less likely to develop breast cancer compared to women in the bottom quintile.

This raises the suggestion that young women might be able to significantly lower their risk of breast cancer simply by eating more high-fibre foods, such as fruits and vegetables. 

However, other associated diet and lifestyle factors may be affecting this outcome. Even if the link is with high-fibre food, it could still be down to benefits other than fibre found in fruit and veg.

If the link does exist, it's unclear why fibre could prevent breast cancer. One speculation offered in the study is that fibres may reduce levels of circulating oestrogen, which is known to trigger abnormal breast tissue growth.

These uncertainties aside, the study is in line with recommendations to eat at least five portions of fruit or vegetables a day to reduce your risk of a variety of diseases.

source: NHS UK


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